Refactoring in the Functional Programming world

I’m an Emacs guy. I was first exposed to Emacs back in 1984 on a VAX running BSD. This was prior to GNU Emacs, so the Emacs that I saw was James Gosling’s Emacs. At the time, I was working on a compiler for a functional programming language called SUPER, which was evaluated using combinator graph reduction.

For many years, and across many languages, including Scheme, C, C++, Perl, TCL, and Java, Emacs was my tool of choice. My hands had the muscle memory for the keystrokes, and over those years I accumulated a file full of Emacs-Lisp customizations for Emacs (by this time, mostly GNU Emacs). When Eclipse started to support refactoring I started using Eclipse as my primary tool for editing Java programs. Refactoring is an example of the kind of high leverage features that I want in my programming tool set.

A few days ago I found some gems buried in a thread on the Scala mailing list. Dave Griffith has been accumulating a list of refactorings for Scala. Here’s his complete list:

Curry Method (split a parameter list, and the arg lists of all callers).

Uncurry Method (merge split parameter list, including merging the arg lists of callers. If method is called with partial args, either complain or automatically create a helper method which represents the partial application, and replace partial calls with it.)

Extract Trait (including searching for other classes which can have the same trait extracted. Tricky with super calls, but not impossible)

Split Trait (splits trait into two traits (putting in self-types if needed), change all extending classes to extend both traits)

Extract Extractor (select a pattern, automatically create an extractor)

Extract Closure (similar to extract method, but creating a function object)

Introduce by-name parameter

Extract type definition (obvious)

Merge nested for-comprehensions into single for-comprehension (and converse)

Split guard from for-comprehension into nested if (and converse)

Convert for-comprehension into map/filter/flatmap chain (and converse)

Wrap parameter as Option (converting null checks, etc.)

Convert instanceOf/asInstance pair to match

Replace case clause with if body to guarded case clause(s)

I was particularly interested in those refactorings related to functional/higher-order programming and pattern matching. Between the surge of interest in Scala, F# and Haskell, it looks like there’s room for some more work in refactoring.

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